Afrezza Inhalation Insulin has been Approved by FDA

Insulin  is a hormone that's produced in the pancreas and carries  glucose (foods that convert into sugar) from the bloodstream and into a cell for later use. Those that make little or no insulin have diabetes.

Insulin is a hormone that’s produced in the pancreas and carries glucose (foods that converts into sugar) from the bloodstream and into the cell for later use. Those that make little or no insulin have diabetes.

Afreeza (the size of a Key) is an inhalation insulin that has just been approved by the FDA. It cannot be used by those that smoke or  have COPD.

Afrezza (the size of a Key) is an inhalation insulin that has just been approved by the FDA. It cannot be used by those that smoke or have COPD.

Excerpt from FDA.gov

“Afrezza is a rapid-acting inhaled insulin that is administered at the beginning of each meal…

The drug’s safety and effectiveness were evaluated in a total of 3,017 participants–1,026 participants with type 1 diabetes and 1,991 patients with type 2 diabetes. The efficacy of mealtime Afrezza in adult patients with type 1 diabetes patients was compared to mealtime insulin aspart (fast-acting insulin), both in combination with basal insulin (long-acting insulin) in a 24 week study… Afrezza is not a substitute for long-acting insulin. Afrezza must be used in combination with long-acting insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes, and it is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis, or in patients who smoke.

Afrezza has a Boxed Warning advising that acute bronchospasm has been observed in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Afrezza should not be used in patients with chronic lung disease, such as asthma or COPD because of this risk. The most common adverse reactions associated with Afrezza in clinical trials were hypoglycemia, cough, and throat pain or irritation…”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGgGjtM5ipg See how it works

https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=TkJ10Nq1xmM&utm_source=streamsend&utm_medium=email&utm_content=23104289&utm_campaign=TCOYD&%23×27;s%20January%20EUpdate  The History of the inhaler and how it was scaled down in size

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