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Reading Food Labels Carefully

img013If you’re not careful, you can easily misread a label. This will affect your blood sugar, your weight, and bolus rate. Read the info in the box labeled Nutrition Facts. There are four large muffins in this container, however, you are only supposed to eat a half of a muffin per meal. This is an excellent rule of thumb for nondiabetics as well. You still make insulin. When you eat, your brain signals the pancreas to deliver insulin found in the Beta cells depending on your blood sugar, and what you eat. If you haven’t eaten and your blood sugar drops, your brain signals the pancreas to release reserved sugar located in the Alpha cells to prevent fatigue. Overworking either cell can cause havoc on the body.

Half muffin is 24 carbs. (Note- Always subtract fiber from total carbs that are 5 grams and higher) 24 carbs-6 grams of fiber= 18 carbs.

The fiber in food that is 5 g or high is not digested. Therefore you subtract it. If you don’t  you will miscalculate your insulin dosage and have unexplained low blood sugars and increased weight gain.

A balanced breakfast would be:

1/2 muffin  (18 carbs)

1 c. plain yogurt or milk (15 carbs)

1 egg (0 carbs)

2 sm turkey sausages ( Note: you might have to bolus for a veggie sausage. Read carb count)

1/2 fruit of your choice (11-15 carbs)

 

 

 

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Should People With Diabetes Take Vitamins?

  1. Talk to your doctor before experimenting with vitamins.
  2. Read reputable websites/trade magazines on vitamins (e.g., Dlife, American Diabetes Assoc, Diabetes Health, WebMD, New Journal Of Medicin).
  3. Schedule an app’t w/a Diabetes Nutritionists about food combinations to serve.
  4. Too much of the wrong food combination can make you hungry and or depelte you of certain nutrients.

Excerpt for Diabetes Health:

“Generally speaking, the nutrient recommendations for people with diabetes are the same as for those without diabetes. On the other hand, diabetes, particularly if uncontrolled, is associated with micronutrient deficiencies. When sugars are high, urination is increased to wash out the extra sugar, and vitamins are washed out as well. So perhaps people with diabetes should be a bit more aggressive in their decision to use supplements.

When deciding what to take, if anything, in the arena of supplements, consider the following tips.

Tips on Taking Supplements

Don’t rely on the fact that someone you know has been using a certain treatment for years. Remember Dr. James Craig, who correctly diagnosed George Washington with a throat infection and then began a series of blood-letting treatments. At the time, blood-letting was a well-regarded treatment that had been used for centuries. Unfortunately, the ex-president soon expired, probably from being bled to death.

Don’t fall for this one: “It’s natural so it must be okay.” Strychnine, botulinum toxin, hemlock, deadly nightshade, elemental lead, elemental mercury are all natural and all deadly. Although most of today’s medications have molecular structures that are based on natural sources (plant-, mold-, or animal-derived), “natural” or “herbal” does not mean “safe.”

Watch out for off-brands of multi-vitamins. A recent study of vitamin E supplements found that a few of the brands contained less than ten percent of the stated amount. In addition to containing the stated amount, the supplement must be in a tablet, capsule, or effervescent form that will dissolve and can be absorbed from the small intestine into the blood stream. Choose a reputable brand such as GNC, TwinLab, Nature Made, and others. Look for something that contains 100% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for most of its constituents. Use that daily multiple vitamin to support a well-rounded and nutritious diet….”